Read: Habakkuk 3:1-6

His brightness was like the light; rays flashed from his hand; and there he veiled his power. (v. 4)

Watching the sun dip into Lake Michigan on a wintery evening is glorious, but darkness comes early and swiftly. Perhaps God closes his hand to veil the power of light, but whether we believe Habakkuk’s vision here is metaphoric or direct revelation, we cannot simply think of light as a metaphoric quality of our God. Genesis tells us God calls light into darkness as his first creative act (Genesis 1:3). The psalmist says God covers himself with light (Psalm 104:1-2), Paul tells Timothy God dwells in unapproachable light (1 Timothy 6:16)—the same Paul who is blinded by his encounter with the risen Jesus (Acts 9:3-9). Moses’ face has to be covered due to its brightness after he talks to God. Jesus’ face becomes like the sun on the mount of transfiguration (Matthew 17:2), and Revelation says that there will be no more need for light from lamp or sun in the coming kingdom as God himself will be our light (Revelation 22:5).

Light is energy, so it’s no great leap to think of light as power, a power that’s mostly hidden from our eyes. If we could see within more of the spectrum, we might not be able to see at all—our vision clouded and distorted by gamma, radio, infrared, X-rays, and other waves. For our sakes, at least partially and temporarily, God has veiled the power of light. —Amy Clemens

As you pray, consider the power of light, and the power of God who both created and veils it.